skip to Main Content
Call Us: (407) 886-0706   Fax: (407) 886-5230

Pet Immunizations in Apopka

 

Immunizations help prevent illnesses that may affect your pet. Vaccinating your pet has long been considered one of the easiest ways to help him or her live a long healthy life. With your first exam at NOAH and at your pet’s annual exam, we will recommend a vaccination protocol that will provide the safest and best protection against disease for your individual pet.

Our goal is to give your individual pet the vaccinations that are needed but not to ever give unnecessarily. 

 

Dog Vaccine

Initial Puppy Vaccination (at or under 16 weeks)
Initial Adult Dog Vaccination (over 16 weeks)
Booster Recommendation
Comments

Rabies 1-year

Can be administered in one dose, as early as 14-16 weeks of age. States regulate the age at which it is first administered.

Single dose

Annual boosters are recommended.

Core dog vaccine. Rabies is 100% fatal to dogs, with no treatment available. Prevention is key.

Rabies 3-year

Can be administered as one dose, as early as 1 year of age. States regulate the age at which it is first administered.

Single dose

A second vaccination is recommended after 1 year, then boosters every 3 years.

Core dog vaccine.

Distemper

At least 3 doses, given between 6 and 16 weeks of age

2 doses, given 3-4 weeks apart

Puppies need a booster 1 year after completing their initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more.

Core dog vaccine. Caused by an airborne virus, distemper is a severe disease that, among other problems, may cause permanent brain damage.

Parvovirus

At least 3 doses, given between 6 and 16 weeks of age

2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart

Puppies need a booster 1 year after completing the initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more.

Core dog vaccine. Canine “parvo” is contagious, and can cause severe vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Parvo is usually fatal if untreated.

Adenovirus
(canine hepatitis)

At least 3 doses, between 6 and 16 weeks of age

2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart

Puppies need a booster 1 year after completing the initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more.

Core dog vaccine. Spread via coughs and sneezes, canine hepatitis can lead to severe liver damage, and death.

Parainfluenza

Administered at 6-8 weeks of age, then every 3-4 weeks until 12-14 weeks old

1 dose

A booster may be necessary after 1 year, depending on manufacturer recommendations; revaccination every 3 years is considered protective.

Non-core dog vaccine. Parainfluenza infection results in cough, fever. It may be associated with Bordetella infection.

Bordetella bronchiseptica (kennel cough )

Depends on the vaccine type; 2 doses are usually needed for protection.

1 dose of the intranasal product or 2 doses of the injected product

Annual or 6-month boosters may be recommended for dogs in high-risk environments.

Non-core dog vaccine. Not usually a serious condition, although it can be dangerous in young puppies. It is usually seen after activities like boarding or showing.

Lyme disease

1 dose, administered as early as 9 weeks, with a second dose 2-4 weeks later

2 doses, 2-4 weeks apart

May be needed annually, prior to the start of tick season

Non-core dog vaccine. Generally recommended only for dogs with a high risk for exposure to Lyme disease-carrying ticks.

Leptospirosis

First dose at 12 weeks; second dose 4 weeks later

2 doses, 2-4 weeks apart

At least once yearly for dogs in high-risk areas

Non-core dog vaccine. Vaccination is generally restricted to established risk areas. Exposure to rodents and standing water can lead to a leptospirosis infection.

Canine influenza

First dose as early as 6 weeks; second dose 2-4 weeks later

2 doses, 2-4 weeks apart

Yearly

Non-core dog vaccine.
Similar to bordetella.

 

Cat Vaccine

Initial Kitten Vaccination (at or under 16 weeks)
Initial Adult Cat Vaccination (over 16 weeks)
Booster Recommendation
Comments

Rabies

Single dose as early as 3 Months of age, depending on the product. Revaccinate 1 year later.

2 doses, 12 months apart

Required annually or every 3 years, depending on vaccine used. State regulations may determine the frequency and type of booster required.

Core cat vaccine. Rabies is 100% fatal to cats, with no treatment available. Prevention is key.

Feline Distemper (Panleukopenia)

As early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.

2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart

1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then no more than every 3 years.

Core cat vaccine. Feline distemper is a severe contagious disease that most commonly strikes kittens and can cause death.

Feline herpesvirus

As early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age

2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart

1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then no more than every 3 years.

Core cat vaccine. Feline herpesvirus causes feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR), a very contagious upper respiratory condition.

Calicivirus

As early as six weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age

2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart

1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then no more than every 3 years.

Core cat vaccine.  A very contagious upper respiratory condition that can cause joint pain, oral ulcerations, fever, and anorexia.

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV)

As early as 8 weeks, then 3-4 weeks later

2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart

1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then annually

Non-core cat vaccine.
Should test FeLV negative first. Transmitted via cat-to-cat contact. Can cause cancer, immunosuppressant

Bordetella

At 8 weeks, then 2-4 weeks later

2 doses, 2-4 weeks apart

Annually

Non-core cat vaccine.
A contagious upper respiratory condition.

CLINIC CLOSURE UPDATE:
Due to Hurricane Ian, our clinic will be closing at 12:00pm Wednesday September 28th. We will be back open for business FRIDAY morning pending unforeseeable circumstances. We appreciate your understanding, and are hoping everyone gets through this storm safely and quickly.
 

If you have an emergency during this time you can contact the Veterinary Emergency Clinic at 407-644-4449

 

At this time the best thing you can do to prepare your pet is have plenty of food and water set aside for them, let them outside before rain starts, and keep them nearby and feeling safe with no available exits during the storm. Thank you!